What happens at an arraignment?

Published by Jessica Burke on

The purpose of an arraignment is to tell a defendant what they are charged with and why they are charged with it.

Arraignments Tell You What Your Charge(s) Is.

The fundamental purpose of an arraignment is to tell a defendant, in open court, what they are charged with. In other words, arraignments tell a Vermont defendant what law it is alleged that a defendant has broken.

Arraignments Tell You What Evidence The State Intends to Use Against You. 

An arraignment tells a defendant and her attorney why she is charged with the crime she is charged with. In other words, the State must disclose what facts it believes support the accusation that you committed the crime.

Arraignments Begin the Criminal Process In Vermont 

Typically an arraignment is just the beginning of the criminal process. The State presents a broad outline of the facts it believes it can establish to support a conviction of the crime charged. An experienced Vermont criminal defense attorney can develop a defense strategy to respond to the allegations made by the State prosecutor at an arraignment. 

Call Now Button